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Podcast 059

Revision #4, 6/24/2009 8:20 PM
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Podcast 059

Revision #5, 6/24/2009 8:29 PM
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Atwood: edit me!

Spolsky: edit me!

Katz: edit me!

(24:45)

Katz: When we switched over to JavaScript, it was just out of a practical matter, and because it's an available language that plays very well with JSON and has a nice sandbox, and I dunno it seems like it's everywhere. Couldn't have made a better choice. I don't understand why all of the sudden it's becoming so popular.

Atwood: Well I think you - the way I understood it - is you finally hooked in JSON and JavaScript - you hooked into the popular - I guess popular isn't the right word, but the common denominator language. A lot of people say 'I get that.' It's not obscure, it's something you can .... And I think in your presentation, you talked about how all of the sudden you were working in the browser - you had downloaded some sort of command-line thing, and you were able to insert data into the database in JavaScript, and all of the sudden it seemed real to you. And that's probably the reaction that a lot of people had right? I don't think that's unique. When you said 'why did it get popular' you gotta think how do we make this accessible to the average developer. And running in the browser - that's pretty accessible.

Katz: To clarify, I'm talking about 'why is JavaScript suddenly so hot?' is my big question. Because it's been around since ... what is it ... '96?

Atwood: But it hasn't really worked until 2005. Because I know for Paul Graham is, "Web 2.0 can be loosely translated as JavaScript now works ... reliably." And that didn't really happen till honestly 2005-2006 in my opinion.

(26:40)

Atwood: edit me!

Spolsky: edit me!

Katz: edit me!

(24:45)

Katz: When we switched over to JavaScript, it was just out of a practical matter, and because it's an available language that plays very well with JSON and has a nice sandbox, and I dunno it seems like it's everywhere. Couldn't have made a better choice. I don't understand why all of the sudden it's becoming so popular.

Atwood: Well I think you - the way I understood it - is you finally hooked in JSON and JavaScript - you hooked into the popular - I guess popular isn't the right word, but the common denominator language. A lot of people say 'I get that.' It's not obscure, it's something you can .... And I think in your presentation, you talked about how all of the sudden you were working in the browser - you had downloaded some sort of command-line thing, and you were able to insert data into the database in JavaScript, and all of the sudden it seemed real to you. And that's probably the reaction that a lot of people had right? I don't think that's unique. When you said 'why did it get popular' you gotta think how do we make this accessible to the average developer. And running in the browser - that's pretty accessible.

Katz: To clarify, I'm talking about 'why is JavaScript suddenly so hot?' is my big question. Because it's been around since ... what is it ... '96?

Atwood: But it hasn't really worked until 2005. Because I know for Paul Graham is, "Web 2.0 can be loosely translated as JavaScript now works ... reliably." And that didn't really happen till honestly 2005-2006 in my opinion.

(26:40)

...

(30:00)

Atwood: ... What a great book Code Complete is. In your presentation you said at one point you have analysis paralysis - where you're working on your own thing, there's nobody telling you what to do, and you reach a decision point where you're like "I can't decide what I should be doing or how I'm supposed to be doing this" - there's noone telling me what to do anymore and it's kindof like you don't know what direction to go in, and I believe the slide title was, "Panic," and your solution was to buy a copy of Code Complete. And I'm just imaginging the smoothing, calming voice of Steve McConnell ...

(30:30)